The Manual for your own personal driver

Uber Towson, Maryland

uber Towson, Maryland

What is Uber you may ask?  Is Uber available in Towson, Maryland It’s the coolest and cheapest private driver service. And Yes! Uber is available Towson, Maryland!  In fact, there is an appfor that available on both  iPhone, Android and Windows phones! The following are a few helpful hints tips and trick to help your very first Uber ride in Towson, Maryland Just think about traveling to Towson, Maryland for your vacation  or business trip.  You might think that the only way around is with a traditional, expensive taxi service or by public transportation which takes hours to get from one destination to another.

The lions share of consumers traveilng around the United States believe that these modes of transportation are reputable and would never try to scam a tourist or business traveler that has not had a chance to familiarize themselves with the area they are visiting. After your reservations with the airline have been confirmed, and your hotel accomidations have been solidified, the only thing left on your todo list is figure out how you will get around town once you arrive.  The nicer resorts and hotels have a shuttle service that will take you to and from the airport.   But if your hotel does not have a shuttle, nor is near a bus stop; then really you only have 3 choices left.

  1. Friends or Relatives
  2. Traditional Taxicab
  3. Uber
TaxiCabs have been in business in the USA since the invention of the autombile.  Millions use traditional taxicabs all the time.  Their big disadvantage is price and inconvience.  If you are in densley populated area, you can usually hail a cab in 5 minutes, however, if you live in sparsley populated area, a cab can take 45 minutes to pick you up.

How To Use Uber in Towson, Maryland

The following steps will make using Uber in Towson, Maryland a breeze.
  1. It is easy to register.  Start by clicking the graphic banner at the bottom to recieve your discount code. Once you are registered, the next step is to download the App by Uber from the app store, next you need to input your credit card account details, and verify that you have recieved your first time riders  Discount Code for a FREE Ride. It is required that you enter the uber discount code prior to requesting your  very first Uber ride in Towson, Maryland.
  2. . Verify how many Uber Towson, Marylandcars are available to pickup riders close to your location in Towson, Maryland
  3. Next check how many cars, employed by Uber, are in the Towson, Maryland area and are can pickup riders that are in your current eighborhood.
  4. Now it is time to summon a ride. The nearest driver for Uber driver in the Towson, Maryland area gets the request, via their Uber Partners app, with your pickup destination.
  5. Make sure that you wither call or text the Uber driver with any information the driver will need to find you, such as out in front of a business.  Reminder:  If you live in a gated community, Do not forget to text the driver with your gate code!
  6.  After the ride is complete, it is time to rat your experience.  Please be mindful that a negative rating can severely hurt a drivers reputation, so only rate low if absolutely necessary.
  7.  Its time to pay.  Stop reaching for your wallet.  All fares are taken care of via the credit card stored on your account.  But don't fret, the first fare is on us.  Tipping is appreciated, but not required (there is nowhere to add a tip,so it will have to be a cash tp).

Your Uber coupon code is:


X9H0F


Towson, Maryland Information:

Towson, Maryland
Census-designated place
The historic 1854 Baltimore County Courthouse located in Towson, Maryland
The historic 1854 Baltimore County Courthouse located in Towson, Maryland
Location of Towson, Maryland
Location of Towson, Maryland
Coordinates: 39°23′35″N 76°36′34″W / 39.39306°N 76.60944°W / 39.39306; -76.60944Coordinates: 39°23′35″N 76°36′34″W / 39.39306°N 76.60944°W / 39.39306; -76.60944
Country  United States
State  Maryland
County Baltimore
Area
 • Total 14.2 sq mi (36.8 km2)
 • Land 14.0 sq mi (36.4 km2)
 • Water 0.1 sq mi (0.4 km2)
Elevation 463 ft (141 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 55,197
 • Density 3,688.7/sq mi (1,424.2/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP codes 21200-21299
Area code(s) 410
FIPS code 24-78425
GNIS feature ID 0591420

Towson (/ˈtsən/) is an unincorporated community and a census-designated place in Baltimore County, Maryland. The population was 55,197 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Baltimore County and the second-most populated unincorporated county seat in the United States (after Ellicott City, Maryland in nearby Howard County).

Contents

  • 1 History
    • 1.1 1600s
    • 1.2 1700s
    • 1.3 1800s
    • 1.4 1900s
  • 2 Geography
    • 2.1 Climate
  • 3 Government
  • 4 Demographics
  • 5 Transportation
    • 5.1 Roads
    • 5.2 Public transportation
    • 5.3 Pedestrians and bicycles
    • 5.4 "Ma and Pa" Railroad
  • 6 Shopping and other attractions
    • 6.1 Hampton Mansion
    • 6.2 Towson Town Center
    • 6.3 Towson Square
    • 6.4 The Shops at Kenilworth
    • 6.5 Towson Place
    • 6.6 Towson Center & Unitas Stadium
  • 7 Education
    • 7.1 Colleges and universities
    • 7.2 Public schools
    • 7.3 Private schools
  • 8 Notable people
  • 9 Medical facilities
  • 10 In popular culture
  • 11 See also
  • 12 References
  • 13 External links

History[edit]

1600s[edit]

The first inhabitants of the future Towson and central Baltimore County region were the "Susquehannock" Indians who hunted in the area. Their region included all of Baltimore County, though their primary settlement was further northeast along the Susquehanna River.

1700s[edit]

Towson was settled in 1752 when two Pennsylvania brothers, William and Thomas Towson, began farming an area of Sater's Hill, northeast of the present-day York and Joppa Roads. William's son, Ezekiel, opened the Towson Hotel to serve the increasing traffic of farmers bringing their produce and livestock to the port of Baltimore. Towson located the hotel at current-day Shealy Avenue and York Road, near the area's main crossroads. The village became known as "Towsontown".

In 1790, businessman Capt. Charles Ridgely completed the magnificent Hampton Mansion just north of Towsontown, the largest private house in America at the time. The Ridgelys lived there for six generations, until 1948. It is now preserved as the Hampton National Historic Site and open to the public.

1800s[edit]

After the ratification of the second Maryland Constitution of 1851, which provided for the jurisdictional separation of the former Baltimore Town, founded 1729, which had served as the county seat since 1767, now the City of Baltimore, since its incorporation in 1796-1797 by the General Assembly of Maryland. Several tortured sets of negotiations occurred to divide the various assets of the City and the County, such as the downtown Courthouse of 1805, the City/County Jail of 1801 along the Jones Falls (at East Madison Street) and the Almshouse, which was also jointly owned. After a series of elections and referendums, on February 13, 1854, Towson became the choice of the remaining, now mostly rural, eastern, northern and western portions of the County as the new county seat of Baltimore County by popular vote. The Court House, still in use by 2015, with its various annexes (and the separate county courts and administrative building) was originally designed by the local city architectural firm of Dixon, Balbirnie and Dixon and completed within a year, constructed of limestone and marble donated by the well-known Ridgely family of nearby Hampton Mansion, on land donated by Towson merchant Grafton Bosley. The County Courthouse was subsequently enlarged in 1910 through additional designs for north and south wings by well-known and regarded city architects, Baldwin & Pennington. Additional expansion later in 1926 and 1958 eventually created an H-shaped plan for the entire older courthouse. An additional modernistic Baltimore County Courts Building, with room for the new charter government since 1956 and administration of a county executive and county council, plus administrative and executive departments was erected in 1970-1971 across a plaza to the west of the older historic courthouse and series of additions The old Baltimore County Jail was built in 1855, and was later replaced by the 1980s by a new modern Baltimore County Detention Center, north of the town on Kenilworth Avenue, with an addition constructed in the 2010s.

From 1850 to 1874, another notable land owner, Amos Matthews, had a farm of 150 acres (0.61 km2) that — with the exception of the 17-acre (69,000 m2) largely natural parcel where the Kelso Home for Girls (currently Towson YMCA), was later erected — was wholly developed into the neighborhoods of West Towson, Southland Hills and other subdivisions beginning in the middle 1920s.

The former Grafton Bosley estate "Uplands", Towson Maryland. after later becoming the Presbyterian Home of Maryland (photo c. 1930)

During the Civil War, Towson was the scene of two minor engagements. Many of Towson's citizens were sympathetic to the southern Confederate cause, so much so that Ady's Hotel, (later the Towson Hotel) and the current site of the 1920s-era Towson Theatre (for movies) and currently the Recher Theatre, flew a Southern flag. The Union Army found it necessary to overtake the town by force on June 2, 1861. During the raid, the Union Army seized weapons from citizens at Ady's Hotel. A local paper, in jest, referred to Towson as the “strongly fortified and almost impregnable city of Towsontown” and downplays the need for the attack, stating, “the distinguished Straw, with only two hundred and fifty men, has taken a whole city and nearly frightened two old women out of their wits.”

The second engagement took place around July 12, 1864, between Union and Confederate forces. On July 10, 1864, a 135-man Confederate cavalry detachment attacked the Northern Central Railway to the north in nearby Cockeysville, under orders from Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, late of Frederick, Maryland. The First and Second Maryland Cavalry, led by Baltimore County native and pre-war member of the Towson Horse Guards, Maj. Harry W. Gilmor, of "Glen Ellen", attacked strategic targets throughout Baltimore and Harford counties, including cutting telegraph wires along Harford Road, capturing two trains and a Union General, and destroying a railroad bridge in Joppa, Maryland. Following what became known as Gilmor's Raid, the cavalry encamped in Towson overnight at Ady's Hotel where his men rested and Gilmor met with friends. The next day, a large federal cavalry unit was dispatched from Baltimore to overtake Gilmor's forces. Though outnumbered by more than two to one, the Confederate cavalry attacked the federal unit, breaking the federal unit and chasing them down York Road to around current day Woodbourne Avenue within Baltimore City limits. Gilmor's forces traveled south along York Road as far south as Govans, before heading west to rejoin Gen. Johnson's main force. Following the war, Gilmor served as the Baltimore City Police Commissioner in the 1870s.

The Towson fire of 1878 destroyed most of the 500 block along the York Turnpike causing an estimated $38,000 in damage.

During the summer of 1894, the Towson Water Company laid wooden pipes and installed fire hydrants that were connected to an artesian well near Aigburth Vale. On November 2, 1894, Towson was supplied with electric service through connection with the Mount Washington Electric Light and Power Company.

1900s[edit]

At the beginning of the century, Towson remained largely a rural community. Land continued to be sold by the acre, rather than as home parcels. Most residences lay within Towson proper: no houses existed west of Central Avenue along Allegheny or Pennsylvania avenues, and there were only three homes along the West Chesapeake Avenue corridor.

In the 1910s, the Maryland State Normal School (now known as Towson University) was relocated to Towson. The Maryland Legislature had established the MSNS in 1865 as Maryland’s first teacher-training school, or normal school. This institution officially opened its doors on 15 January 1866, but as time passed, enrollment in the school grew exponentially, rendering the facilities inadequate. In 1910, the General Assembly formed a committee to oversee site selection, budget, and design plans for the new campus, which settled on an 80-acre (320,000 m2) site in Towson and the General Assembly financed the $600,000 move in 1912. Construction began in 1913 on the Administration Building, now known as Stephens Hall. In September 1915, the new campus, comprising Stephens Hall, Newell Hall, and the power plant, began classes. The college underwent numerous name changes, settling on Towson University in 1997.

As the growth of Baltimore's suburbs became more pronounced after World War II, considerable office development took place in Towson's central core area. Many of the large Victorian and colonial-style residences in the vicinity of the Court House were demolished in the 1980s and 1990s for offices and parking.

Towson United Methodist Church

In 1839, Epsom Chapel became the first Christian house of worship in Towson, used by various denominations. As the population grew in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, several churches were built to serve the community, such as Calvary Baptist Church, Immaculate Conception Catholic Church, Trinity Episcopal Church, First Methodist Church, and Towson Presbyterian Church. Epsom Chapel was demolished in 1950 when Goucher College sold a portion of its property for development of the Towson Plaza shopping center, now Towson Town Center. First Methodist Church moved in 1958 to land also acquired from Goucher College and is now Towson United Methodist Church.

Author Robert Coston, who grew up in the area of Towson now called "Historic East Towson," recalled in an interview the unique African-American history of that area during the mid-century: "I think that the Towson, Maryland area that I am familiar with differs from other parts of Maryland because of the proximity to one of the largest slave plantations in the country. The Ridgely Plantation which owned all of the property from Baltimore County to Baltimore City and other surrounding areas. ...This was a very unique place of which I have never heard of any equal to it. Every African American school age child in Baltimore County had to attend school at some point at Carver in East Towson. ...I realize now that as a youngster the older African Americans avoided talking about slavery or the nearby Ridgely Plantation because they themselves were not too far removed from slavery itself."

Geography[edit]

Towson is located at 39°23′35″N 76°36′34″W / 39.39306°N 76.60944°W / 39.39306; -76.60944 (39.392980, −76.609562).

According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 14.2 square miles (37 km2), of which, 14.0 square miles (36 km2) of it is land and 0.2 square miles (0.52 km2) of it (1.06%) is water.

The community is located immediately north of Baltimore City, inside the Beltway (I-695), east of I-83 and along York Road. Its census boundaries include Pikesville to the west, Lutherville and Hampton to the north, Parkville to the east, and Baltimore to the south.

Major neighborhoods in Towson include Anneslie, Idlewylde, Greenbriar, Southland Hills, Rodgers Forge, Stoneleigh, Wiltondale, Towson Manor Village, Hunt Crest Estates, Knollwood-Donnybrook, East Towson, and West Towson. Ruxton, which lies to the west, is sometimes considered a part of Towson. Eudowood is a Towson neighborhood named after Eudocia, the wife of Dr. John T. Stansbury - on whose former estate it is situated.

Climate[edit]

The climate in this area is characterized by hot, humid summers and generally mild to cool winters. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Towson has a humid subtropical climate, abbreviated "Cfa" on climate maps.

Government[edit]

The Maryland Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services is headquartered at Suite 1000 at 300 East Joppa Road in the Towson CDP.

Demographics[edit]

Towson Population History
Census year Population
1960 19,090
1970 77,768*
1980 51,083
1990 49,445
2000 51,793
2010 55,197
*Census Boundaries in 1970 extended beyond the community proper
Towson, Maryland Weather

Why Is Uber Better than TaxiCab?

Uber has two advanatges over a traditional taxicab service.

Price -  Uber costs less per ride than a traditional taxi service.  Because drivers use their own personal vehicles instead of a costly commercial fleet, their costs are much lower than a traditional taxicab service.

Convience - Uber is an app based service with a clean and simple UI.  Uber uses GPS coordinates to pinpoint the closest driver.  They give you an updated Estimated Time of Arrival, for both when your Uber driver arrives at your door, and also an ETA for when are supposed to arrive at your destination.


Additional Uber City Coupon Codes