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Uber Mccreary County, Kentucky

uber Mccreary, Kentucky

What is Uber you may ask?  Is Uber available in Mccreary County, Kentucky It’s the coolest and cheapest private driver service. And Yes! Uber is available !  In fact, there is an appfor that available on both  iPhone, Android and Windows phones! The following are a few helpful hints tips and trick to help your very first Uber ride in Mccreary County, Kentucky Just think about traveling to Mccreary County, Kentucky for your vacation  or business trip.  You might think that the only way around is with a traditional, expensive taxi service or by public transportation which takes hours to get from one destination to another.

The lions share of consumers traveilng around the United States believe that these modes of transportation are reputable and would never try to scam a tourist or business traveler that has not had a chance to familiarize themselves with the area they are visiting. After your reservations with the airline have been confirmed, and your hotel accomidations have been solidified, the only thing left on your todo list is figure out how you will get around town once you arrive.  The nicer resorts and hotels have a shuttle service that will take you to and from the airport.   But if your hotel does not have a shuttle, nor is near a bus stop; then really you only have 3 choices left.

  1. Friends or Relatives
  2. Traditional Taxicab
  3. Uber
TaxiCabs have been in business in the USA since the invention of the autombile.  Millions use traditional taxicabs all the time.  Their big disadvantage is price and inconvience.  If you are in densley populated area, you can usually hail a cab in 5 minutes, however, if you live in sparsley populated area, a cab can take 45 minutes to pick you up.

How To Use Uber in 

The following steps will make using Uber in Mccreary County, Kentucky a breeze.
  1. It is easy to register.  Start by clicking the graphic banner at the bottom to recieve your discount code. Once you are registered, the next step is to download the App by Uber from the app store, next you need to input your credit card account details, and verify that you have recieved your first time riders  Discount Code for a FREE Ride. It is required that you enter the uber discount code prior to requesting your  very first Uber ride in Mccreary County, Kentucky.
  2. Verify how many Uber Mccreary County, Kentuckycars are available to pickup riders close to your location in Mccreary County, Kentucky
  3. Next check how many cars, employed by Uber, are in the Mccreary County, Kentucky area and are can pickup riders that are in your current neighborhood.
  4. Now it is time to summon a ride. The nearest driver for Uber driver in the Mccreary County, Kentucky area gets the request, via their Uber Partners app, with your pickup destination.
  5. Make sure that you wither call or text the Uber driver with any information the driver will need to find you, such as out in front of a business.  Reminder:  If you live in a gated community, Do not forget to text the driver with your gate code!
  6.  After the ride is complete, it is time to rat your experience.  Please be mindful that a negative rating can severely hurt a drivers reputation, so only rate low if absolutely necessary.
  7.  Its time to pay.  Stop reaching for your wallet.  All fares are taken care of via the credit card stored on your account.  But don't fret, the first fare is on us.  Tipping is appreciated, but not required (there is nowhere to add a tip,so it will have to be a cash tp).

Your Uber coupon code is:


Cities in Mccreary County

Mccreary County, Kentucky Information:

McCreary County, Kentucky
McCreary County Kentucky courthouse.jpg
McCreary County courthouse in Whitley City
Map of Kentucky highlighting McCreary County
Location in the state of Kentucky
Map of the United States highlighting Kentucky
Kentucky's location in the U.S.
Founded 1912
Named for James B. McCreary
Seat Whitley City
Largest community Pine Knot
 • Total 431 sq mi (1,116 km2)
 • Land 427 sq mi (1,106 km2)
 • Water 4.1 sq mi (11 km2), 1.0%
 • (2010) 18,306
 • Density 43/sq mi (17/km²)
Congressional district 5th
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4

McCreary County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. As of the 2010 census, the population was 18,306. Its county seat is Whitley City. The county is named for James B. McCreary, a Confederate war hero and Governor of Kentucky from 1875 to 1879, and 1911 to 1915. During his second term as Governor of Kentucky, McCreary County was named in his honor.

McCreary County is the only Kentucky county to not have a single incorporated city. Because of this, county government is the sole local government agency for the entire county. Attractions in McCreary County include the Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area, Cumberland Falls State Park, and the Big South Fork Scenic Railway, which tours several former coal camps.

The majority of the county is owned by the federal government. 43% is owned and managed by the Daniel Boone National Forest, and 18% owned and managed by the National Park Service as the Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area.


  • 1 History
  • 2 Government and infrastructure
  • 3 Geography
    • 3.1 Geology
    • 3.2 Adjacent counties
    • 3.3 National protected areas
  • 4 Demographics
  • 5 Economy
    • 5.1 Transportation
  • 6 Communities
  • 7 Attractions
  • 8 Notable residents
  • 9 See also
  • 10 References
  • 11 External links


McCreary County was formed on March 12, 1912, the 120th and final county in order of formation. The present county boundaries contain 427.7 square miles (1,107.7 km2) of land area. The majority of the county was carved out of Wayne and Whitley Counties, with a large center strip following the rail line and roadway from Pulaski County, and a northeastern portion taken from Laurel County. The early history of the area is that of those counties, and is related in the historic perspectives for them. The map to the left shows the network of roadways that had been established by the 1860s. A dotted blue line and settlement names have been added for reference. During the Civil War, the region was the scenario of heavy fighting between Union and Confederate forces fighting for control of Fort Donelsen, and as part of the Union effort to secure the Cumberland. The fall of Fort Donelsen culminated in the eventual capture of Nashville.

Historic Map of McCreary County Area

The most significant early feature of the future county was the Jacksboro Road. Running from Jacksboro, Tennessee, to Point Isabel and Somerset, this pioneer road was simply an enlargement of the Tellico Trail, an Indian route that had been used for thousands of years. Several other trails intersected this road, and led to the growth settlement villages such as Pine Knot, Dripping Springs/Coolidge, and Flat Rock. Other settlement occurred in far flung, sequestered hollows. The economy of the times was based upon small-scale subsistence agriculture, timber products such as railroad ties and barrel staves, and small coal mines.

Beginning in the early 19th century, Cumberland Falls gained attention as an early tourism destination. Later development increased visitation, and the Brunsen Inn was a popular destination for seasonal visitors. Until a road was built from Whitley County in 1931, the primary access to the Falls was through McCreary. With a generous contribution from one of the DuPont family heirs, the Falls joined the state park system in 1930.

The completion of the Cincinnati Southern Railway line through the county in 1880 changed its economic characteristics forever. Access to distant markets for timber and coal caused the emergence of many small mining and logging companies. Nothing however, was to have the impact of the Justus S. Stearns enterprises. From 1903 throughout most of the 20th century, the territory of McCreary County was dominated and controlled by Stearns company interests.

Attempting to avoid financial losses during the Great Depression of the 1930s, the Stearns cluster of companies sold vast quantities of land to the U.S. Government, becoming part of what was to become the Cumberland National Forest in 1937. This forest reserve was subsequently renamed Daniel Boone National Forest. In the 1970s, legislative action acquired additional lands in southern McCreary and Tennessee, creating the Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area in the mid-1970s.

Government and infrastructure[edit]

  • Judge Executive Hon. Douglas E "Doug" Stephens (R)
  • Deputy Judge Executive Hon. Randy L Jones (R)
  • County Magistrates:
    • Magistrate Dist. 1 Stanley Cox (R)
    • Magistrate Dist. 2 Roger Phillips (R)
    • Magistrate Dist. 3 Jason Mann (R)
    • Magistrate Dist. 4 Frankie Ball (D)
  • County Clerk Eric Haynes (R)
  • Sheriff Randy Waters (D)
  • Jailer Tony Ball (D)
  • Coroner Timothy L. Corder (R)
  • Tourism Director Tara Chaney
  • Economic Development Director Susan Stephens

The Federal Bureau of Prisons U.S. Penitentiary, McCreary is in the county, near Pine Knot.


According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 431 square miles (1,120 km2), of which 427 square miles (1,110 km2) is land and 4.1 square miles (11 km2) (1.0%) is water.


Natural Arch, a prominent feature of Daniel Boone National Forest, is located in McCreary County

The western boundary of McCreary County represents the division between two geological plateau systems, the Pennyroyal and the Cumberland, which are located in the Mississippian Plateau and the Eastern Coal Field respectively. Running diagonally along the Wayne-McCreary County line and through southern Pulaski County is the Pottsville Escarpment. This rugged strip of land is the dividing feature separating the geologically younger Eastern Kentucky Coal Field region from the older, western geology of the state. It is a sandstone belt of cliffs and steep sided, narrow crested valleys. It is located in the Daniel Boone National Forest.

Among the more spectacular features are the sheer cliffs themselves, and numerous gorges, waterfalls, rock shelters, and natural stone arches. Two of the best known sections of the escarpment in Kentucky are the Red River Gorge Geological Area and the Natural Bridge State Park in the north-central portion of the Daniel Boone National Forest.

McCreary and the southern reaches of Pulaski County represent the beginnings of the Cumberland Plateau and the Eastern Kentucky Coal Field region. Most of the geological underpinning of this region is capped with thick sandstone, and formidable coal seams are common in this formation. The terrain is sharply dissected by valleys and stream systems, and limited lands suitable for large-scale conventional agriculture exist. Because of this, the economies of the area have historically been centered upon extractive industries such as timber and mining.

Adjacent counties[edit]

  • Pulaski County (north)
  • Laurel County (northeast)
  • Whitley County (east)
  • Campbell County, Tennessee (southeast)
  • Scott County, Tennessee (south)
  • Wayne County (west)

National protected areas[edit]

  • Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area (part)
  • Daniel Boone National Forest (part)


Historical population
Census Pop. %±
1920 11,676 —
1930 14,627 25.3%
1940 16,451 12.5%
1950 16,660 1.3%
1960 12,463 -25.2%
1970 12,548 0.7%
1980 15,634 24.6%
1990 15,603 -0.2%
2000 17,080 9.5%
2010 18,306 7.2%
Est. 2014 17,863 -2.4%
U.S. Decennial Census
1790-1960 1900-1990
1990-2000 2010-2013

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