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Uber Hopkins County, Kentucky

uber Hopkins, Kentucky

What is Uber you may ask?  Is Uber available in Hopkins County, Kentucky It’s the coolest and cheapest private driver service. And Yes! Uber is available !  In fact, there is an appfor that available on both  iPhone, Android and Windows phones! The following are a few helpful hints tips and trick to help your very first Uber ride in Hopkins County, Kentucky Just think about traveling to Hopkins County, Kentucky for your vacation  or business trip.  You might think that the only way around is with a traditional, expensive taxi service or by public transportation which takes hours to get from one destination to another.

The lions share of consumers traveilng around the United States believe that these modes of transportation are reputable and would never try to scam a tourist or business traveler that has not had a chance to familiarize themselves with the area they are visiting. After your reservations with the airline have been confirmed, and your hotel accomidations have been solidified, the only thing left on your todo list is figure out how you will get around town once you arrive.  The nicer resorts and hotels have a shuttle service that will take you to and from the airport.   But if your hotel does not have a shuttle, nor is near a bus stop; then really you only have 3 choices left.

  1. Friends or Relatives
  2. Traditional Taxicab
  3. Uber
TaxiCabs have been in business in the USA since the invention of the autombile.  Millions use traditional taxicabs all the time.  Their big disadvantage is price and inconvience.  If you are in densley populated area, you can usually hail a cab in 5 minutes, however, if you live in sparsley populated area, a cab can take 45 minutes to pick you up.

How To Use Uber in 

The following steps will make using Uber in Hopkins County, Kentucky a breeze.
  1. It is easy to register.  Start by clicking the graphic banner at the bottom to recieve your discount code. Once you are registered, the next step is to download the App by Uber from the app store, next you need to input your credit card account details, and verify that you have recieved your first time riders  Discount Code for a FREE Ride. It is required that you enter the uber discount code prior to requesting your  very first Uber ride in Hopkins County, Kentucky.
  2. Verify how many Uber Hopkins County, Kentuckycars are available to pickup riders close to your location in Hopkins County, Kentucky
  3. Next check how many cars, employed by Uber, are in the Hopkins County, Kentucky area and are can pickup riders that are in your current neighborhood.
  4. Now it is time to summon a ride. The nearest driver for Uber driver in the Hopkins County, Kentucky area gets the request, via their Uber Partners app, with your pickup destination.
  5. Make sure that you wither call or text the Uber driver with any information the driver will need to find you, such as out in front of a business.  Reminder:  If you live in a gated community, Do not forget to text the driver with your gate code!
  6.  After the ride is complete, it is time to rat your experience.  Please be mindful that a negative rating can severely hurt a drivers reputation, so only rate low if absolutely necessary.
  7.  Its time to pay.  Stop reaching for your wallet.  All fares are taken care of via the credit card stored on your account.  But don't fret, the first fare is on us.  Tipping is appreciated, but not required (there is nowhere to add a tip,so it will have to be a cash tp).

Your Uber coupon code is:


X9H0F


Cities in Hopkins County

Hopkins County, Kentucky Information:

Hopkins County, Kentucky
Hopkins County Courthouse KY.JPG
Hopkins County Courthouse in Madisonville
Map of Kentucky highlighting Hopkins County
Location in the state of Kentucky
Map of the United States highlighting Kentucky
Kentucky's location in the U.S.
Founded 1806
Named for Samuel Hopkins
Seat Madisonville
Largest city Madisonville
Area
 • Total 554 sq mi (1,435 km2)
 • Land 542 sq mi (1,404 km2)
 • Water 12 sq mi (31 km2), 2.2%
Population
 • (2010) 46,920
 • Density 87/sq mi (34/km²)
Congressional district 1st
Time zone Central: UTC-6/-5

Hopkins County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. As of the 2010 census, the population was 46,920. Its county seat is Madisonville. The county was formed in 1806 and named for General Samuel Hopkins, an officer in both the American Revolutionary War and War of 1812, and later a Kentucky legislator and U.S. Congressman.

The Madisonville, KY Micropolitan Statistical Area includes all of Hopkins County.

The topography ranges from flatlands along the broad river valleys of the Pond River, Tradewater River, and Green River, to hilly and rolling land in the southern and central parts of the county. Coal mines operate in the southern part of Hopkins County and agriculture is a mainstay in the northern part. Major crops are soybeans, corn, and tobacco. Along with coal, resources include oil and natural gas. Hopkins County ranks second in the state both in terms of total coal extracted (782 million tons) and in total coal reserves remaining (7.2 billion tons).

Contents

  • 1 History
  • 2 Geography
    • 2.1 Adjacent counties
  • 3 Demographics
  • 4 Education
    • 4.1 Elementary schools
    • 4.2 Middle schools
    • 4.3 High schools
    • 4.4 Community College
  • 5 Communities
  • 6 See also
  • 7 References
  • 8 External links

History[edit]

The earliest inhabitants were prehistoric Native Americans who lived, hunted, and farmed in the region. One of their settlements was a rough stone structure on Fort Ridge, which has since been destroyed by strip mining for coal. Some of the early settlers were Revolutionary War veterans who received land grants for their service from Virginia in the area southwest of the Green River. Among these was Baron Von Steuben, a Prussian general who had trained George Washington's Continental Army at Valley Forge during the winter of 1776-77. He had received a grant of several thousand acres in the northwest part of the county. According to tradition, Von Steuben was wounded in an Indian attack on his first visit to Kentucky. He then quit-claimed his property. Nevertheless, a salt spring on his grant came to be known as Steuben's Lick. By the 1880s, the community that grew up around the lick was known as Manitou.

Roads in the county often followed animal trails that led to salt and mineral springs. The major traces were those ones connected the county seat at Madisonville with Henderson to the north, Hopkinsville to the south, and Russellville to the southeast. Numerous other trails led to the mills and ferries on the Pond and Tradewater Rivers and their tributaries.

On January 3, 1829, Ashbyburg in the northeastern part of the county was incorporated. Located on the Green River, it thrived as a steamboat landing during the 19th century. Other antebellum communities included Nebo, Kentucky, northwest of Madisonville, and Charleston, Kentucky, named after "Free Charles," a black freedman who operated a tavern in the southwest part of the county.

Hopkins County was divided by the American Civil War. Union supporters joined the 35th Kentucky Mounted Infantry, a regiment recruited locally by James M. Shackelford, while Adam Rankin Johnson had earlier recruited Confederate troops for his 10th Kentucky Cavalry Regiment. The courthouse in Madisonville was burned by Kentucky Confederates led by Gen. Hylan Benton Lyon on December 17, 1864, as they passed through western Kentucky, since it was being used to house Union soldiers. However, the harsh policies imposed by the occupying Union armies caused much more resentment and served to increase the sympathy for the Confederate cause. Ever since then, local politics have been heavily dominated by the Democratic party.

Farming was the major occupation in Hopkins County for most of the 19th century, with tobacco the leading crop. Around 1837 local blacksmith James Woolfolk found an outcropping of coal on his land. John Bayless Earle, for whom the town of Earlington, Kentucky was named, opened the first coal mine in the county in 1869. Mining did not become a major industry until the Louisville & Nashville Railroad pushed its line southward from Henderson through Madisonville and toward Nashville in 1870. Two years later, the Elizabethtown and Paducah Railroad (now Paducah and Louisville Railway) entered the county from the east. Many communities grew quickly as railroad stops, including Mortons Gap, Kentucky, Hanson, Kentucky, Nortonville, Kentucky, and White Plains, Kentucky. Dawson Springs, Kentucky, in the southwestern part of the county, began to thrive in the 1880s as a health resort, but its popularity had faded by the time of the Great Depression of the 1930s.

By 1970 Hopkins County was the second largest producer of coal in the Western Coal Field, after Muhlenberg County, and the third-largest coal producer in the entire state after Muhlenberg and Pike County. In 1971 the county also ranked fifth in Kentucky in oil production. Coal and oil-related businesses were major county employers by 1990. Development of resources was aided by the construction of the north-south Pennyrile Parkway and the east-west Western Kentucky Parkway through the county by the early 1970s. In 1987 farms occupied 41 percent of the land area, with 72 percent of farmland under cultivation.

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 554 square miles (1,430 km2), of which 542 square miles (1,400 km2) is land and 12 square miles (31 km2) (2.2%) is water.

Adjacent counties[edit]

  • Webster County (northwest)
  • McLean County (northeast)
  • Muhlenberg County (southeast)
  • Christian County (south)
  • Caldwell County (southwest)

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop. %±
1810 2,964 —
1820 5,322 79.6%
1830 6,763 27.1%
1840 9,171 35.6%
1850 12,441 35.7%
1860 11,875 -4.5%
1870 13,827 16.4%
1880 19,122 38.3%
1890 23,505 22.9%
1900 30,995 31.9%
1910 34,291 10.6%
1920 34,133 -0.5%
1930 37,449 9.7%
1940 37,789 0.9%
1950 38,815 2.7%
1960 38,458 -0.9%
1970 38,167 -0.8%
1980 46,174 21.0%
1990 46,126 -0.1%
2000 46,519 0.9%
2010 46,920 0.9%
Est. 2014 46,376 -1.2%
U.S. Decennial Census
1790-1960 1900-1990
1990-2000 2010-2013

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