The Manual for your own personal driver

Uber Chico, California

uber Chico, California

What is Uber you may ask?  Is Uber available in Chico, California It’s the coolest and cheapest private driver service. And Yes! Uber is available Chico, California!  In fact, there is an appfor that available on both  iPhone, Android and Windows phones! The following are a few helpful hints tips and trick to help your very first Uber ride in Chico, California Just think about traveling to Chico, California for your vacation  or business trip.  You might think that the only way around is with a traditional, expensive taxi service or by public transportation which takes hours to get from one destination to another.

The lions share of consumers traveilng around the United States believe that these modes of transportation are reputable and would never try to scam a tourist or business traveler that has not had a chance to familiarize themselves with the area they are visiting. After your reservations with the airline have been confirmed, and your hotel accomidations have been solidified, the only thing left on your todo list is figure out how you will get around town once you arrive.  The nicer resorts and hotels have a shuttle service that will take you to and from the airport.   But if your hotel does not have a shuttle, nor is near a bus stop; then really you only have 3 choices left.

  1. Friends or Relatives
  2. Traditional Taxicab
  3. Uber
TaxiCabs have been in business in the USA since the invention of the autombile.  Millions use traditional taxicabs all the time.  Their big disadvantage is price and inconvience.  If you are in densley populated area, you can usually hail a cab in 5 minutes, however, if you live in sparsley populated area, a cab can take 45 minutes to pick you up.

How To Use Uber in Chico, California

The following steps will make using Uber in Chico, California a breeze.
  1. It is easy to register.  Start by clicking the graphic banner at the bottom to recieve your discount code. Once you are registered, the next step is to download the App by Uber from the app store, next you need to input your credit card account details, and verify that you have recieved your first time riders  Discount Code for a FREE Ride. It is required that you enter the uber discount code prior to requesting your  very first Uber ride in Chico, California.
  2. . Verify how many Uber Chico, Californiacars are available to pickup riders close to your location in Chico, California
  3. Next check how many cars, employed by Uber, are in the Chico, California area and are can pickup riders that are in your current eighborhood.
  4. Now it is time to summon a ride. The nearest driver for Uber driver in the Chico, California area gets the request, via their Uber Partners app, with your pickup destination.
  5. Make sure that you wither call or text the Uber driver with any information the driver will need to find you, such as out in front of a business.  Reminder:  If you live in a gated community, Do not forget to text the driver with your gate code!
  6.  After the ride is complete, it is time to rat your experience.  Please be mindful that a negative rating can severely hurt a drivers reputation, so only rate low if absolutely necessary.
  7.  Its time to pay.  Stop reaching for your wallet.  All fares are taken care of via the credit card stored on your account.  But don't fret, the first fare is on us.  Tipping is appreciated, but not required (there is nowhere to add a tip,so it will have to be a cash tp).

Your Uber coupon code is:


X9H0F


Chico, California Information:

City of Chico
Charter city
City Plaza in Chico
City Plaza in Chico
Nickname(s): City of Trees
Location of Chico in California
Location of Chico in California
City of Chico is located in USA
City of Chico
City of Chico
Location in the United States
Coordinates: 39°44′24″N 121°50′8″W / 39.74000°N 121.83556°W / 39.74000; -121.83556Coordinates: 39°44′24″N 121°50′8″W / 39.74000°N 121.83556°W / 39.74000; -121.83556
Country  United States
State California
County Butte
Founded 1860
Incorporated January 8, 1872
Founded by John Bidwell
Government
 • Type Council–manager government
 • City council Mayor Mark Sorensen
Ann Schwab
Tami Ritter
Randall Stone
Reanette Fillmer
Sean Morgan
Andrew Coolidge
 • City Manager Mark Orme
 • State Legislators Sen. Jim Nielsen (R)
Asm. James Gallagher (R)
Area
 • City 33.095 sq mi (85.716 km2)
 • Land 32.923 sq mi (85.271 km2)
 • Water 0.172 sq mi (0.446 km2)  0.52%
Elevation 197 ft (60 m)
Population (April 1, 2010)
 • City 86,187
 • Estimate (2013) 88,077
 • Density 2,600/sq mi (1,000/km2)
 • Metro 221,117
Demonym(s) Chicoan
Time zone Pacific (UTC−8)
 • Summer (DST) PDT (UTC−7)
ZIP codes 95926–95929, 95973, 95976
Area code 530
FIPS code 06-13014
GNIS feature IDs 1655890, 2409447
Website www.chico.ca.us

Chico is the most populous city in Butte County, California, United States. The population was 86,187 at the 2010 census, up from 59,954 at the time of the 2000 census. The city is a cultural, economic, and educational center of the northern Sacramento Valley and home to both California State University, Chico and Bidwell Park, one of the country's 25 largest municipal parks and the 13th largest municipally-owned park. Bidwell Park makes up over 17% of the city.

Other cities in close proximity to the Chico Metropolitan Area (population 212,000) include Paradise and Oroville, while local towns and villages (unincorporated areas) include Durham, Cohasset, Dayton, Nord, and Forest Ranch. The Chico Metropolitan Area is the 14th largest Metropolitan Statistical Area in California.

The nickname "City of Roses" appears on the Seal of the City of Chico. The city has been designated a Tree City USA for 31 years by the National Arbor Day Foundation.

Contents

  • 1 History
  • 2 Geography
    • 2.1 Location
    • 2.2 Topography
    • 2.3 Street system
    • 2.4 Neighborhoods
    • 2.5 Parks and creekside greenways
    • 2.6 Climate
  • 3 Demographics
    • 3.1 2010
    • 3.2 2000
  • 4 Economy
    • 4.1 Top employers
  • 5 Government
    • 5.1 Municipal
    • 5.2 County
    • 5.3 State
    • 5.4 Federal
  • 6 Education
    • 6.1 Primary education
      • 6.1.1 Elementary
      • 6.1.2 Junior high (7th and 8th)
    • 6.2 Secondary education
      • 6.2.1 Public
      • 6.2.2 Alternative education
      • 6.2.3 Private
    • 6.3 Higher education
  • 7 Culture
    • 7.1 Museums
    • 7.2 Art and theatre
  • 8 Points of interest
  • 9 Sports
    • 9.1 Bicycling
    • 9.2 Former sports organizations
  • 10 Agriculture
  • 11 Transportation
    • 11.1 Air
    • 11.2 Land
    • 11.3 Major highways
  • 12 Media
    • 12.1 Print
    • 12.2 Broadcast
  • 13 Sister cities
  • 14 Defense
  • 15 Notable people
  • 16 See also
  • 17 References
  • 18 External links

History[edit]

Main article: History of Chico, California
Bidwell Mansion

The original inhabitants of the area now known as Chico were the Mechoopda Maidu Native Americans.

The City of Chico was founded in 1860 by John Bidwell, a member of one of the first wagon trains to reach California in 1843. During the American Civil War, Camp Bidwell (named for John Bidwell, by then a Brigadier General of the California Militia), was established a mile outside Chico, by Lt. Col. A. E. Hooker with a company of cavalry and two of infantry, on August 26, 1863. By early 1865 it was being referred to as Camp Chico when a post called Camp Bidwell was established in northeast California, later to be Fort Bidwell. The city became incorporated January 8, 1872.

Chico was home to a significant Chinese American community when it was first incorporated, but arsonists burned Chico's Chinatown in February 1886, driving Chinese Americans out of town.

Historian W.H. "Old Hutch" Hutchinson identified five events as the most seminal in Chico history. They included the arrival of John Bidwell in 1850, the arrival of the California and Oregon Railroad in 1870, the establishment in 1887 of the Northern Branch of the State Normal School, which later became California State University, Chico (Chico State), the purchase of the Sierra Lumber Company by the Diamond Match Company in 1900, and the development of the Army Air Base, which is now the Chico Municipal Airport.

Several other significant events have unfolded in Chico more recently. These include the construction and relocation of Route 99E through town in the early 1960s, Playboy Magazine naming Chico State the number-one party school in the nation in 1987, and the establishment of a "Green Line" on the western city limits as protection of agricultural lands.

Geography[edit]

Location[edit]

Chico is at the northeast edge of the Sacramento Valley, one of the richest agricultural areas in the world. The Sierra Nevada mountains lie to the east, with Chico's city limits venturing several miles into the foothills. To the west, the Sacramento River lies 5 miles (8 km) from the city limits.

Topography[edit]

City Plaza in Chico

Chico sits on the Sacramento Valley floor close to the foothills of the Cascade Range to the north and the Sierra Nevada range to the south. Big Chico Creek is the demarcation line between the ranges. The city's terrain is generally flat with increasingly hilly terrain beginning at the eastern city limits.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 27.8 square miles (72 km2), of which 27.7 square miles (72 km2) is land and 0.04% is water.

The city is bisected by Bidwell Park, which runs 5 miles (8 km) from the flat city center deep into the foothills.

The city is also traversed by two creeks and a flood channel, which feeds the Sacramento River. They are named Big Chico Creek, Little Chico Creek, and Lindo Channel (also known as Sandy Gulch, locally).

Street system[edit]

The downtown area of Chico is located generally between Big Chico Creek and Little Chico Creek. The downtown has a street grid offset 49.75° from the four cardinal directions. There are numbered streets and avenues, which generally run east-northeast to west-southwest. Blocks are usually addressed in hundreds corresponding to the numbered streets and avenues. While the east-northeast to west-southwest streets and avenues are numbered, streets running north-northwest to south-southeast are generally named after trees. The part of the "tree" streets that intersect the Chico State campus spell the word "CHICO" at Chestnut, Hazel, Ivy, Cherry, and Orange streets.

The main thoroughfare running northwest–southeast through the city is State Route Business 99, not to be confused with Highway 99. Business 99 has several common names. From Northwest to Southeast, these are Esplanade, Main Street/Broadway (these are one-way southeast and northwest, respectively, in downtown Chico), Main Street/Oroville Avenue (similarly one-way), Park Avenue, and Midway. The city streets are designated as "east" or "west" by their relation to this street.

There are numbered streets and avenues both of which flow east–west. This fact can cause confusion. The "streets" are south of the Chico State campus through downtown, while the "avenues" are north of campus through The Esplanade. There are no left turns permitted onto any odd numbered avenue from The Esplanade, in either direction, with the exception of West 11th Avenue.

In the numbered streets and avenues and most other streets that intersect The Esplanade, Main, and Park, the west addresses are all numbers whose last two digits are 00 through 49 and the east addresses are all numbers whose last two digits are 50 through 99. There are few exceptions.

On most Chico streets odd addresses are on the south side of the street.

Standing at the bridge over the Big Chico Creek—where Main Street changes to The Esplanade—and facing north, the odd addresses are on the left. (Bidwell Mansion is 525 The Esplanade.) This convention holds for all the numbered avenues. However, while facing south the odd addresses are still on the left (i.e., the convention has switched). This convention holds throughout the numbered streets.

Many streets in Chico, most notably Nord Avenue/Walnut Street, change street names after small bridges. When the city was being built, these streets were on the outskirts of town and did not require bridge building. Modern residents of Chico use these streets frequently, and the name changes can cause confusion.

Neighborhoods[edit]

The Senator Theater, completed in 1928 for $300,000, was designed by Timothy L. Pflueger for Michael Naify and the Nasser Brothers.

Downtown Chico – This is the main commercial district in Chico. It is located generally between the Big Chico Creek and Little Chico Creek between Wall Street and Salem Street. The Downtown Chico Business Association represents the interests of the downtown to the community. Main Street and Broadway are the two main thoroughfares bisecting the downtown. Ringel Park is the triangular-shaped area immediately north of downtown. The Chico City Plaza is the central point of downtown, between Fourth and Fifth Streets. The area of West Ninth Street where Main Street and Oroville Avenue converge is known as The Junction, the southernmost part of the downtown. "The Junction", as the confluence of Humboldt Road and the old Shasta Stage Road (now Main Street and The Esplanade), got its name in the early 1860s when John Bidwell and partners established a company that created a stage line between Chico and Susanville, ultimately leading to Ruby City, Idaho, and the rich gold strikes there. This is the place where Humboldt Road began; it is now called Humboldt Avenue until it reaches the Highway 99 freeway, then regains the Humboldt Road name on the eastern side as it continues into the foothills. "The Junction" was for some years a business district unto itself, providing goods and services to people arriving at and departing from the stage depot.

South Campus – The South Campus neighborhood is the area bounded by West Second Street, Salem Street, West Ninth Street and the western city limits (which is called "The Green Line"). Historically, this area was the first residential area established in the city. Currently, it is the most densely populated area of the city. The South Campus Neighborhood Association represents the interests of the neighborhood to the community. South Campus is a dynamic residential neighborhood consisting overwhelmingly of young renters under thirty-five, and specifically Chico State students. The intersection of Fifth and Ivy streets is a neighborhood commercial core sometimes referred to locally as "Five and I." There are many fraternity and sorority houses in the area, and the city has designated a "Fraternity/Sorority Overlay Zone", largely contiguous with the neighborhood. South Campus is home of Craig Hall and Depot Park.

Barber – The Barber neighborhood is a working class residential neighborhood generally south of Little Chico Creek and west of Park avenue. The Barber Neighborhood Association represents the interests of the neighborhood to the community. This neighborhood was originally built to house the employees of the adjacent Diamond Match Factory. The neighborhood was named after Ohio Columbus Barber, president of the Diamond Match Company. Today, the Diamond Match property is designated for a future development called Barber Yard.

Chapmantown – This is a working-class residential neighborhood entirely surrounded by area inside the city of Chico, but which itself is not a part of the city. Rather, it is under the jurisdiction of the County of Butte. Chapmantown is currently known as the area bounded by Little Chico Creek, Boucher Street, Guill Street and East Sixteenth Street. The neighborhood south of East Twentieth Street to the east of Fair street is also referred to as Chapmantown. Historically, Chapmantown referred to everything east of Mulberry street, but that is no longer the case. Due to not being within city limits, there are no sidewalks, sewers, or any other city services. However, there are also none of the regulations associated with the municipality either (prohibition on chicken coops, burn permits, etc.) The neighborhood is home to The Dorothy F. Johnson Neighborhood Center, a facility of the Chico Area Recreation District. The neighborhood is named after Augustus Chapman.

The Avenues – A relatively new name that refers to the area north of Big Chico Creek historically known as Chico Vecino. This area includes the numbered avenues that intersect The Esplanade. This residential neighborhood is adjacent to the northern boundary of Chico State campus and is south of Lindo Channel. The neighborhood also is home to Enloe Medical Center.

Mansion Park is the high end residential neighborhood adjacent to the Bidwell Mansion, and immediately between the northeast corner of the Chico State campus and Chico High School. This neighborhood is notable for its being a preferred parking zone for residents with permits only, located in an area of the city with very impacted parking. This neighborhood is home to the Albert E. Warrens Reception Center (formerly the Julia Morgan House), and the Bidwell Amphitheatre. Originally, home to mostly university professors and staff, other professionals and upper-middle-class families now also call it home.

Kendall Hall at Chico State

Doe Mill is the developing urban residential neighborhood generally north of East Twentieth Street and East of Bruce Road.

Nob Hill is the developing residential neighborhood west of Bruce Road and north of Highway 32.

California Park is the developing residential neighborhood east of Bruce Road and north of Highway 32. This area contains a smaller area known as Canyon Oaks.

Aspen Glen is the residential neighborhood east of the Esplanade and north of East Shasta avenue. Many streets there are named after things associated with Colorado.

Cussick Area Neighborhood is an assortment of different housing types on the northwest end of town. It is flanked by orchards, the Esplanade, and West East Avenue.

Big Chico Creek Estates is a middle class development in the southwest area of town, Backed by Big Chico Creek, and very close to Chico's newest elementary school.

Little Chico Creek Estates generally referred to as "Chico Creek Estates", is a middle-class development that is bordered to the north by Little Chico Creek, to the west by Bruce Road, to the South by a seasonal flood control channel and Doe Mill neighborhood and bordered to the east by Stilson Canyon. Prior to its development in the late 1980s and early 1990s, Little Chico Creek Estates was an olive orchard. As a result, the streets in the neighborhood are named after olive varieties.

Connors Neighborhood is a very small neighborhood squeezed between East East Avenue and Rio Lindo and between the Esplanade and Highway 99. Connors Neighborhood is made up of Connors Ave and White Ave, along with a couple of courts and circles. This neighborhood was incorporated into Chico in 2003; the state plans to add sewers in Q1 of 2011.[citation needed]

Other neighborhoods include South Park, North Park, Vallombrosa, Baroni Park, Heritage Oaks and Hancock Park.

Chico also is home to several large new urbanist neighborhoods, either planned or under construction, including Doe Mill, Barber Yard, Meriam Park, The Orchard and Westside Place.

The above-mentioned "neighborhoods" do not include large sections of Chico. There are numerous other areas that each have unique characteristics and attractions. While some of these areas were not so long ago outside of city limits, they have always been a part of the Chico community. Most of these areas are well established with a high percentage of residents who have lived there for more than 20 years. In the older areas of the outlying neighborhoods, it is not uncommon to find households that have been there for fifty or even more years.[citation needed]

Parks and creekside greenways[edit]

Upper Bidwell Park
Parks
  • Verbena Fields: This site is a former quarry that is currently being restored into a natural park. The project will expand and improve seasonal wetlands, increase the floodplain width, restore native plantings, establish Mechoopda cultural planting areas, construct a walking trail loop, and provide public education.
  • Baroni Park
  • Bidwell Park
  • Children's Playground
  • Depot Park
  • DeGarmo Park
  • East 20th St at Notre Dame Park (undeveloped)
  • Hancock Park
  • Henshaw Park (undeveloped)
  • Hooker Oak Recreation Area
  • Ceres Park (undeveloped)
  • Humboldt Park (Humboldt at Willow)
  • Nob Hill/Husa Ranch Park
  • Peterson Park
  • City Plaza
  • Ringel Park
  • Skateboard Park
  • Wildwood Park
  • Martin Luther King Park
  • Chapman Park
  • Oak Way Park
  • Rotary Park (Wall Street)
  • Rotary Park (Sixteenth and Broadway)
Creekside Greenways
  • Little Chico Creek
  • Mud Creek
  • Sycamore Creek
  • Commanche Creek
  • Sandy Gulch (Lindo Channel) Greenway
  • Bear Hole (in Upper Bidwell Park)
  • Alligator Hole (in Upper Bidwell Park)
  • Salmon Hole (in Upper Bidwell Park)

Climate[edit]

Chico and the Sacramento Valley have a typically Mediterranean climate (Köppen Csa). Temperatures can rise well above 100 °F (38 °C) in the summer. Chico is one of the top metropolitan areas in the nation for number of clear days. Winters are fairly mild and wet, with the most rainfall coming in January. July is usually the warmest month, with an average high temperature of 94 °F (34 °C) and an average low temperature of 61 °F (16 °C). January is the coolest month, with an average high temperature of 55 °F (13 °C) and an average low temperature of 35 °F (2 °C). The average annual rainfall is 27 inches (690 mm). Tule fog is often present during the autumn and winter months.

Climate data for Chico, California (1981–2010 normals)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 77
(25)
82
(28)
93
(34)
98
(37)
108
(42)
115
(46)
117
(47)
116
(47)
114
(46)
107
(42)
91
(33)
78
(26)
117
(47)
Average high °F (°C) 55.1
(12.8)
61.1
(16.2)
66.3
(19.1)
72.6
(22.6)
81.3
(27.4)
88.7
(31.5)
94.2
(34.6)
93.7
(34.3)
89.7
(32.1)
79.4
(26.3)
64.8
(18.2)
55.6
(13.1)
75.3
(24.1)
Average low °F (°C) 35.4
(1.9)
38.3
(3.5)
41.5
(5.3)
45.2
(7.3)
51.9
(11.1)
56.7
(13.7)
60.5
(15.8)
58.3
(14.6)
54.6
(12.6)
46.9
(8.3)
39.9
(4.4)
35.3
(1.8)
47.1
(8.4)
Record low °F (°C) 12
(−11)
16
(−9)
23
(−5)
27
(−3)
30
(−1)
38
(3)
40
(4)
38
(3)
35
(2)
23
(−5)
20
(−7)
11
(−12)
11
(−12)
Average precipitation inches (mm) 4.86
(123.4)
4.42
(112.3)
4.29
(109)
1.75
(44.4)
1.04
(26.4)
.48
(12.2)
.02
(0.5)
.08
(2)
.42
(10.7)
1.42
(36.1)
3.28
(83.3)
4.61
(117.1)
26.67
(677.4)
Source: Western Regional Climate Center
Chico, California Weather

Why Is Uber Better than TaxiCab?

Uber has two advanatges over a traditional taxicab service.

Price -  Uber costs less per ride than a traditional taxi service.  Because drivers use their own personal vehicles instead of a costly commercial fleet, their costs are much lower than a traditional taxicab service.

Convience - Uber is an app based service with a clean and simple UI.  Uber uses GPS coordinates to pinpoint the closest driver.  They give you an updated Estimated Time of Arrival, for both when your Uber driver arrives at your door, and also an ETA for when are supposed to arrive at your destination.


Additional Uber City Coupon Codes